Nail polish to detect date rape drugs

Nail Polish is now not only meant for style, but helping women from possibly being drugged.   Stock Photo

Nail Polish is now not only meant for style, but helping women from possibly being drugged.

Women nail polish is now not just used for fashion, but also for preventing date rape. 

Byline: Jasel Rico, Staff Writer 

A new invention created by college students can aid in making sure women will not be taken advantage of while drinking.

Females have been facing the horror of date rape drugs since 1990 when they came about. Four North Carolina University students have come up with a concept: a nail polish that is getting a lot of attention. The creators of the nail polish claim it can detect any drugs in your beverage. The students have come up with a product called “Undercover Colors”. All anyone has to do is stick a finger in their beverage; if it changes colors, you have an unwanted date rape drug. This can be a tool to use against date rape, yet, it is not getting to the core of the problem, which is educating everyone on sexual consent.

The University students got the attention of the media due to the fact that they won a contest called the LuLu egames. The idea of the contest is to come up with innovative ways to battle real life situations. An investor has even come forward backing the university students’ idea financially. Yet, we all must remember it’s just a concept when asked when a product will be available they all declined to answer saying that they are in the very early stages of making the product.

There are many concerns coming from women’ rights groups, the opposing side of the product. Rebecca Nagle, co-director of a group based in Baltimore Called FORCE, thinks the responsibility does not fall on just one person.

“Yes, we need to take the steps towards ending rape and preventing rape, and it’s really not the responsibility of people who might be raped to do that. It’s actually the responsibility of two groups of people,” Nagle said. “One is the perpetrators. People need to stop raping people. And it’s also the responsibility of communities and our country.”

All of our communities are being affected by rape, and it is becoming a nationwide epidemic. Most people might not be that aware due to the fact that many cases don’t get reported by male and females due to the shameful and hurtful experience. Twenty-three year-old English major Sarah Ortiz would take the responsibility into her own hands.

“Yes, if this product was available to purchase. I would buy it. I would rather double check myself instead of putting that responsibility on someone else. I would be taking matter into my own hands.” Ortiz said.

Another student, Varujan Arutyunyan, felt like this might not work. He feels that women should never take drinks from strangers in the first place.

The thirty-nine year-old art major said “it could create a false sense of safety, and I wouldn’t want my girlfriend thinking that this is the only way of combating spiked drinks. All girls should beware of taking drinks from stranger, might not ever be a safe or smart thing to do.”

At the moment, the product is just a concept; there is no actual nail polish available on the market. We also don’t know when it will be available for the public, how much a bottle will cost or what colors will be available.

If such a product does become available, some women may feel more comfortable while drinking in public or even with their friends.

Your thoughts?