Monarchs, get your shorts on

A SHORT SPEECH - Media Arts Department Chair Eric Swelstad introduces half a hundred one-minute student short films at the Annual Student Showcase at the Music Building Recital Hall Oct. 17.Alvin Cuadra / Photo Editor

A SHORT SPEECH – Media Arts Department Chair Eric Swelstad introduces half a hundred one-minute student short films at the Annual Student Showcase at the Music Building Recital Hall Oct. 17.

MEDIA ARTS: Student filmmakers screen short films for the public.

by Connie Geraghty, Staff Writer and Kyla Hulett, Copy Editor

The Media Arts department held its Annual Student Showcase to a standing room only crowd Saturday as the patrons who found seats and lined the walls excitedly awaited the showing of 50 student short films that lasted one minute 25 seconds each.

The films are semester-long projects that are turned in during the last week of class. For many of these aspiring filmmakers, these shorts become a record of their early ventures into the craft of film making. Media Arts Department Chair Eric Swelstad said he is proud to be sharing his students’ work with the community and giving them a platform.

“It’s really an event for the filmmakers, to honor them and their hard work,” Swelstad said. “Each film is a complete labor of love for these students.”

The screening, which was held Oct. 17 in the Music Building, was not only packed with students and faculty, but with family and friends of the filmmakers.

Multiple media arts and cinema courses require students to write, direct and produce short films. It allows students to experience the film-making process. Students from the Fall 2014/ Spring 2015 semesters got the chance to show their completed films.

The films covered a variety of themes, including comedy, drama, suspense, thriller and romance. Mayte Delgado used his film “PSA Death Row Dogs Rescue” to encourage pet adoption. Colin Campbell’s “X=WTF” told about his struggle  with algebra.

“The reason I left college in the 90’s was because of math and I’m struggling with it now, so I decided to vent my frustration through the film ” Campbell said.

Student Brad Koszo, whose “Death Mute” is a horror film about an American Sign Language teacher filming an educational video in the serenity of the woods, said of the experience, “I didn’t realize how far budgeting and planning goes. It takes a lot of people to do this.”

 

 

 

 

 

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